Tagged: Tutorial

Tutorial 27052016

I had my tutorial with Jonathan on Friday. We spoke about the logistics for the final show and the best way to present my final piece. Although I’ve had some breakthroughs in producing VR content in Unity and Blender, I’m still not entirely sure which would be best for the show. On one side, if I can get my hands on an Oculus or Vive, a PC based Unity build would make it possible for the viewer to explore the environment as they wish. However its proving difficult to get my hands on one for the final show, so I’ll have to consider a rendered equi-rectangular film to be shown on a google cardboard. (I could explore simplifying the Unity build to allow it to be app based, but it wouldn’t have the same impact as the PC version). It’ll most likely have to be a rendered film. There are benefits to both options, however conceptually and aesthetically it’d be better for the viewer to have full control of their movement.

Thinking through the presentation for VR in the gallery, there’s the important question of user experience. I’m apprehensive about the funfair/arcade-style queueing that I’ve seen at a number of exhibitions, but there’s nothing I can do about it. The emergence of the technology makes it currently very attractive to try no matter the context. This fact gives an added pressure to the outcome. Realistically, during the private view, I’ll have to be organised and if I were able to use the open world version of the work I’d have to restrict the time of each viewer’s experience depending on the interest. This can be done a number of ways though I’ve been considering a script that cancels all colliders after a certain period of time, forcing the FirstPerson to fall through the structures, ending the simulation. However, again, this is for the PC version of the work.

The other option is a 5/6 minute fixed animation on a loop. The biggest pro for this option is the quality of the final render and the fact that the headset will be portable (potentially multiple headsets). The biggest problem would be the battery life of the phones.

As for the physical door, I’m going to have to go at it with a Jigsaw and re-arrange it at Wilson Road. My other option was to try to borrow a horse box….

I’m currently working on my Symposium 2. The Research Paper settled my conceptual interests in the freedoms and restrictions of religion/spirituality and the internet. Within this I approached and considered addiction, identity, disembodiment and propaganda within this question. My interest in the relationship between user and device has been inspired by Nam June Paik’s work, which has evolved rapidly since studying his work in more detail for the paper. This time last year, we began to form our research questions, and at the time I didn’t expect it to have had such an impact on my overall practice. It has allowed me to consider the concepts in a purely academic context. ‘The Medium is the Message’, (Marshall McLuhan), and Virilio’s ‘Information Bomb’ have been important texts during this process.

In many ways, my concept hasn’t changed for the last 6 or 7 months. The idea of a Gateway, a device as access to an extension of physical space and identity. My interim exhibit ‘Congregation’ was also an attempt at exploring this idea. Aesthetically, I’ve tried to develop ideas from early in the MA such as trying to represent to multiple identities one holds online and the physical, 3-dimensional make-up of everyday information.

As i’m approaching the final weeks of the MA, I’m happy to be in a position where there are aesthetic and conceptual choices that can be made rather than rushing to finish. Though, I’m aware that its looking less likely I’ll be able to secure a headset for the final show, which makes the Unity experience I’ve been developing somewhat frustrating / partially obsolete. Depending on what happens with the headset, there may still be an 11th hour panic!! Mainly the issue of organising and rendering the film.

I’m still making changes to the work, and having been through a number of versions, in recent days, I can see significant changes happening before the final exhibition version.

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Research Paper Tutorial 23092015

Just wanted to do a quick post on last week’s tutorial for the Research Paper. Unfortunately, due to traffic, I wasn’t able to attend the tutorial, but instead managed to do it on loudspeaker in the car from Vauxhall Bridge to Camberwell.

From what was said, the feedback was positive, though there’s still a lot of work to be done. My argument, and particularly my abstract need to be whittled down to its key points. I naturally have a tendency to waffle, so trimming the fat on the paper will be my focus over the next few weeks. Having read a previous version of the essay, it already contains only half of the sources it originally did….. Some of these sources I’m not sure why i even read them in the first place.. Richard Dawkins isn’t the most inspiring writer.

During the research period, I read far beyond my subject and naturally tried to include these sources into my argument. It wasn’t until I read through that i realised how diluted the core question had become. I took my scissors to the essay and produced the first draft, which, after speaking with Gareth, still needs to be set in the right direction.

The first section looks into the evolution of Paik’s TV Buddha, and more specifically its ability to question the ever-evolving relationship between user and device. I’m happy with how this has gone, however the remaining sections begin to tail off. Considering this, I’m going to focus more on the implications of Paik’s Buddha, rather than the slightly questionable sections that followed.

Overall, Gareth seemed happy with the quality of the writing and the basis of the question, the main issues seemed to be in solidifying the argument. He suggested that this would come from re-organising the abstract. At the moment, my abstract is 800 words long….. Gareth suggests it should be around 3/400.. So… here lies the problem, I’m trying to pack too much into a 4000 word essay… Standard over-thinking things.

I’m continuing my work on the essay, as I don’t want to lose momentum, and it needs to be finished! However, as Jonathan said, I will be focussing more of my time on making work, and getting prepared for the Unit 1 Assessment.

Tutorial 3 11062015

Approaching my third tutorial (4th if I include Keir WIlliams), I had a read through some of the notes from the last ones. The first thing that struck me was an actual sense of progression. Words I’d written, and discussions I’d had with Jonathan, in October, were merely ramblings, but seeing the fact that I’ve put these plans to fruition has given me a sense of satisfaction in the work I’ve done on the MA so far. My post last night was clearly lacking any reflection on my blog, and the things I’ve written. Here are a few extracts from my Tutorial overview in October.

We talked about the hilarity of media consumption, specifically within the news. How can, what should be the most delicate information, be broadcast as entertainment across the world. I am no angel with this and certainly have fallen into the trap of watching the news daily, but after a while I can’t help but think that much of it is a gross exploitation of sensitive information.”

We discussed my interest in embedding BBC news live into a painting of a family in their living room. It aims to highlight the growing issue of daily news consumption and it’s effects on it’s audience. In this piece, I aim to mirror project the live images onto a canvas. In the gallery, I’m focused on it’s first impressions, whether the audience take it for what they came to see, art, or whether they begin to use it as another information point.”

Obviously there have been some changes, the most evident being the fact I used an actual TV rather than a canvas. Also, the family in the living room shows my utter dedication to figurative painting at the time. ‘Monitor’ obviously had no such people.

Last minute pre-tutorial Notes: 

Religion – Stained Glass Windows – Really need to research this. Links to the ultrasonic sensors as well as clear conceptual link (The light, usually an uncontrollable force,) and stylistic link – bold, graphic display. Often figurative, narrative and of course Religious!

Idea of the window into another dimension – The Television (The Media Space) – Virtual Space

The intent of religious iconography and paintings. Telling Stories. Creating meanings.

Self reflection – social media, internet history.

Nam June Paik vs Daniel Rozen?….. Not sure about Rozen. Still undecided.

Multimedia Cityscapes – This has turned to the creation of skyscrapers out of pieces of information. I want to develop this a bit further.

TUTORIAL REFLECTION: 

Although I planned to come into college today, unfortunately I didn’t get the chance, and instead my tutorial was done over Skype.

At first we spoke about my post from last night, and how this level of honesty towards my work was positive. I explained that I’d written some notes immediately before the tutorial (See above). I found that after reading through my previous tutorial posts, I had in fact made positive steps towards fulfilling my intentions. In fact the simple act of doing this, a post last night, and some notes this morning showed me how through small steps I can have such a different insight to my work. At the beginning of the course, this blog was the devil to me, maybe because I didn’t see any legitimacy in what I was doing, or was worried about revealing a thought process. I see now, that the blog does, over time, give an opportunity to better understand the work your doing. When this information is in retrospect, there’s a clearer understanding.

We moved on to begin talking about my research question. I’m going to focus on Religion, yet I’m not entirely sure what aspect as yet, maybe as a practice? Nam June Paik’s TV Buddha is a work that I’ve been familiar with for a while, but like all of Paik’s work, I’ve never properly looked into it. Jonathan explained that he saw the Buddha at Tate Liverpool in 2010, and that this idea of past and present staring back at one another, something that I had written about last night, wasn’t exactly the case. The camera set up should be displaying a live feed. I think some of the reading I did may have looked a little too far into the maybe a second or two delay between the scene and the footage. Nonetheless, its an interesting insight, but its based on old technical hitches.

This piece is particularly interesting because Paik didn’t really plan it. It was a last minute decision to fill space in the gallery. Jonathan made the point that he was so embedded in his practice that even though it was put together quickly, the thoughts behind it were the result of this practice, that had spanned decades. We spoke about how it certainly does connect with Rozen’s mirror works, Weave Mirror, Wooden Mirror, and most recently, the Penguins. My reluctance to use him in my research paper comes from how gimmicky this work comes across. Its something I’ve been thinking about with my Arduino project. Artists, whom aren’t necessarily brilliant technicians, certainly find use with new technologies and specifically electronics, however, Rozen seems to focus on this idea of the mirror, and creating pixels with actual objects. When I was first made aware of the Wooden Mirror I thought it was brilliant, but after seeing other works, that are just the same but with different materials, my enthusiasm dropped significantly. Jonathan made the point that he has other work, and I don’t know it, so until I look further into it, I can’t be too critical.

There is clearly a connection between the works. Jonathan mentioned the ‘gaze’ and the idea of gazing into something, and that giving something back to you. Its obvious in the Buddha, and in any mirror I guess. Jonathan mentioned that this does fit in broadly to what I’m interested in. He went on to mention that it’d be an ideal subject for the research paper as it does shed light on my work, without talking about it specifically. As a sidenote, this idea of the gaze is also relevant to one of my favourite painters Edouard Manet.

This idea of the gaze, Jonathan linked to Narcissus and the understanding of self-identity, which is most definitely relevant in today’s social media world. The sense of forced self-reflection and absorption couldn’t be more relevant, and is certainly an important factor in the definition of digital identity. Its this dedication to something, even though, for many its themselves, that moves me to look into Religion. These feelings that people feel the necessity to update their profiles and share their lives is comparable to a religious practice.

Jonathan began to talk about longevity and made an incredibly important point. Work like TV Buddha naturally focuses on the longevity of the reflection. As its technically been going since the 1970s, this element is integral to the work itself. He went on to compare this to religious practice. It isn’t about the initial gratification, but what religion gives you over a long period of time. Putting this into a digital environment, I’ve had facebook for 10 years, and therefore connections to almost all the friends I’ve had over that time. My social life almost relies on it to keep those connections, as obviously peoples lives move apart from one another. At one point in the future I hope to be in touch with some of these people, and therefore will always have this connection to the site. I’m emotionally tied to it. We didn’t talk about this, but it ties in with the meaning being created through the longevity of the connection, such as is with the Buddha and his reflection.

Religious practice takes time.

Jonathan told me of another work that looks at the gaze. It’s called The Venetian Mirror, and in fact exhibited alongside Rozen’s Wooden Mirror at the V&A. Here’s a Video:

Its a very interesting work. A flat screen TV is suspended in portrait from the ceiling. A member of the audience is invited to sit on a stool behind the TV. Whilst the audience look at the TV. A camera captures the person on the stool, however the shutter speed is particularly low, and for someone to have their image fully displayed on the TV, they would have to sit still for several minutes. It certainly shows similarities to actual portrait work where the sitter would be there for hours.

Again this idea of longevity came up from this work. I mentioned that it reminded me of Damien Hirst’s ‘A Thousand Years,’ 1990, which we both agreed was one of the few of Hirst’s works that was actually any good. I’ve always liked this work, and its definitely my favourite of his. Well, it says it in the title. Longevity is essential to its meaning. It reflects the circle of life and death, and thinking about this now, it’ll be interesting to see again and again over time. It certainly links to Paik’s interest in Time Art, and particularly the Buddha’s 40 year gaze.

I then related these ideas to my recent post ‘Anglerfish, Candy Crush and Ultrasonic Sensors.’ Specifically the nature of Candy Crush as a game. The fact that you only have a certain amount of lives a day, and if you lose them, you either pay or you have to bother someone else to get the game, for some reason makes it more interesting, and addictive! Clearly this isn’t really related to Hirst’s work, but the concept of longevity certainly exists. No one just plays one game and leaves it, just as the scale of meaning for a work like ‘TV Buddha’ or ‘A Thousand Years’ isn’t detected in one instance. Its the history of these works, that they themselves create, that projects the scale of its meaning. Its funny to think that multiple generations of people will live and die before Hirst’s piece finishes, perhaps it can be seen as the longest existing piece of performance art, and the first piece to employ flies as the performers. Anyway, after mentioning Candy Crush, we went a little off track, as my often pointless connections do.

We picked up after I mentioned that religion did play a part in my project proposal, however, not quite as much as i’d like now. History and religion I think have always been what I’ve loved most about paintings. Whether its Realist and political such as Courbet, Millet or Manet (the first two of which also step foot in religious subject matter) or the grand, ornate ceilings and large canvases of the Renaissance. After reading through my previous tutorial notes, I noticed that Jonathan had hinted stained glass windows to me, which is now beginning to really make a lot of sense, and as I aim to continue on this context of religion, I will definitely be drawing inspiration from it.

Jonathan explained that the interesting part of the windows is not just the narrative form of the image but the fact that there’s an external influence on its aesthetic, and experience – The Light. This light is in itself is a metaphor for insight, and something larger, and uncontrollable, perhaps God. The juxtaposition here would be that if I succeed in using sensors to control whether paintings are viewable, the viewer would have that control. This also reflects an understanding and control over unattainable information that would previously be left for prayer, and how digital technology gives the opportunity to find and use that information.

Jonathan told me to look into CODEC, a research center based at Durham. Its not art based research, its philosophy and theology. They actively look into how the internet and other technological elements of the modern world change the face, and / or interact with religion and specifically Christianity. It seems it may be worth researching their endeavours, and maybe even getting in contact. Potentially very interesting and valuable.

A codec is a device, either physical or virtual, hardware or software, for translating, re-coding, re-engineering the analogue and the digital. CODEC is not an acronym: it is a name.

We want to see how the contemporary world interacts with the world of the theology and religion – particularly the Christian faith story.”

I explained that I was aiming to meet with Ed to discuss continuing work on the LED circuit, but because of the strain for some of the 2nd years, as they approach their final show, it seems that it might have to go back on the shelf. It’d be ambitious to believe I can create it in 3 and a half weeks or so. Jonathan sees it not too much of a problem if the full installation was ready for the interim.

Developing Maquettes is still an important part of the work. I’ve been advised not to run away from the painting. My issue has been finding the figures. I can use 3D models to manipulate the poses but there’s no expression, or realism to these. They’re more akin to Greek sculptures from the Doric period. Though I’ll try to use some of the figures from my recent trip to Athens, as well as some photos of Greek Gods themselves. There are a load more photos to go up, some of which will tie in nicely with some of the discussion we had today.

As a final point, I mentioned my continued interest in the possibility of virtual space, and the creation of non-locations etc. Jonathan believes I should continue to look into it, alongside Digital Identity, and let them influence each other. I need to remain open to exploring the cross between the two. I really just need to continue making work, and specifically one for the Interim show, update my project proposal and develop my research question for the discussion with Gareth and the class next week!

Overall, I found the tutorial very useful, and will implement some of these ideas further with my work.

Pre-Tutorial 3 11062015

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I feel my progression in recent weeks has been dyer. I’ve focussed too strongly on work outside of the course, and I feel its beginning to effect my practice. My intention from my application and the first draft of my project proposal was to find an equilibrium between both physical and digital elements in my work. I don’t feel I’ve got much closer to this goal, which is sad but obviously its better now than never that I notice this drop. I’ve succeeded in learning new software and hardware, as well as the opportunities they allow. However, looking over my proposal, there is a lot to be changed.

The title ‘Digital Identity and the Virtual Space Race’ is now too vague for me. “Digital Identity” as a concept in itself is too broad. Its definition is yet set in stone, as it encompasses the entirety of a person’s online contribution. I’ve become more interested in focussing on an element of identity, and what better to investigate for both individuals and communities, than Religion. I mean Religion as “A particular system of faith and worship” and/or “A pursuit or interest followed with great devotion”. These are just two of the definitions of Religion written in the Oxford English dictionary. What better place to start… Obviously I’m not using it alongside any actual, existing, and practiced Religion. Its simply the dedication shown by a person (or user)… Maybe Worship is a better word.

Whatever it is that we use the internet for, there’s certainly a sense of worshipping its functions. The insights into the worlds of others, and of our own, without much effort at all, anywhere, anytime. This fact alone can be seen in how we perceive friendships, relationships, ethics, morales, research, charity, services, communication, entertainment, pleasure, health! All of this and more from one thing. For something to have such an effect on some of the most important elements of your life, you have to trust and worship it.

A Digital Native, if unplugged from the web, would have to compensate for all of these factors and translate them in the real world, which is obviously possible, but would at first be a culture shock. (I mean, imagine going back to letters…..) The phrase “you don’t know what you’ve got till its gone” comes to mind. Growing up in a world surrounded by something that is relentlessly popular amongst everyone you meet will inevitably be engrained in your very existence, unless your the salmon of course. In this way, the digital or internet uprising we’ve experienced in the last few decades is comparable to an international, growing religion

A……. Digital-igion…… hahaha…. the stupidest combination of words possible. how about Techno-ligion….. You get the point. (That point being, that I should never mix two words together again…)

Nam June Paik’s TV Buddha, although not intentionally, sparks debate on religion and technology, the past and present, old and new….. The Buddha in the present sits still whilst being filmed, he watches opposite, as himself stares back at him from the past. At the same time, The Buddha recorded from the past sits opposite watching himself in the present…. This has a number of questions surrounding it. An interesting one would be to compare it to the self-reflection of social media. The fact that you can scroll back through your history like a journal with multiple categories and parameters. Does this idea of self-reflection, or maybe even self-absorption effect that person’s reality? I believe it does, and surely it can’t be good for people to reminisce too often. I despise TimeHop for this reason. Bringing this back, given the fact that Millenials, and the more recent Generation Z are reliant on their online activity, is this comparable to addiction or religion? and if so, can religion be seen as an addiction?

TV Buddha in regards to religion clearly holds its link from the simple fact that a Buddha is at its core. Some have said that the piece represents Western media and the Oriental Deity, but in today’s context, I don’t believe the faith system, or where the tv and camera were made, really matters. For me, its either showing the reflective effects that information technology has had on the legitimacy and relevance of religion, or, I.T. usage as a quasi-religion (or as neo-religious) itself.

In the past, developing news stories were literally word of mouth or hear say through the grapevine. There certainly is still an element of that on Twitter, but, for the most part, we usually receive facts within minutes of an event unfolding. I have faith that the news and social media services will deliver me this information in realtime. I have faith that I will be able to communicate through Facebook and other sites, with people I haven’t seen in years, if I so wished to. A letter is more likely not to arrive on time, or even at all!, whereas I have faith that my Facebook message will. How does this change that persons outlook on friendships and relationships? When “Keeping in touch” is made too easy. Thats slightly off point, that is a whole other element of Digital Identity.

To conclude, what I’m trying to say, is that my project proposal, as it stands, is not specific enough. This Objective: “Decipher the differences between the ‘real self’ and digital identity by unravelling each individually,” incorporates a wide range of elements, all of which I aim to look into, but maybe not all of it can be done on the MA. As for the digital architecture and virtual space race side of my proposal. I have a very focussed interest on the emergence of this technology as a consumer item. By simply defining this NoWhere Space, I believe it gives the opportunity to look into the identities created within it. The other side to this, would be to record and research the loss of identity on a real stage / setting. (Society of Spectacle).

For the Research Paper, I hope to find a contrasting work to Nam June Paik’s TV Buddha. I was considering Daniel Rozin’s new mirror-like work made out of revolving Penguins, but this is something I need to discuss in the tutorial.

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I’ve played around with visual languages. I naturally don’t like to stick to the same thing for too long, which can be seen as a pitfall, however, I’m optimistic with the potential outcomes, especially as we approach the Interim show. In a previous post I’ve mentioned using a similar process to ‘Monitor,’ using fishing wire, and in another post I’ve said I hoped to use the Ultrasonic sensor and LEDs with canvas and duct tape…. I stand by both of  these, and actually aim to incorporate these altogether, though this depends on whether it’ll work…. but I have faith. i’m meeting Ed maybe next week to discuss it.

RIGHT, off to sleep…. or I won’t get the opportunity to discuss this… or even begin work on phishermans.net !!!!!

To Phish – “To try to obtain financial or other confidential information from Internet users, typically by sending an email that looks as if it is from a legitimate organisation, usually a financial institution, but contains link to a fake website that replicates the real one.”

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26022015 Tutorial with Keir Williams

We had a constructive chat. It was great experience to talk about my work with someone who hadn’t seen it before. We discussed the different concepts surrounding my work such as Interaction, and how really my work is actually Reactive, rather than Interactive. He’s sent me an article on the difference:

Distinguishing Concepts – Lexicons of Interactive Art and Architecture

http://www.haque.co.uk/papers/distinguishing_concepts.pdf

Keir also sent me a few other things to look at:

An Interactive Art Festival – http://www.aec.at/prix/en/kategorien/

Keir Williams Lecture Work – http://id.uwedigitalmedia.com/

He made distinct connections with my work and the Futurists / Constructivists.

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He also compared some of my work to a pretty niche film from the early 90s, The Lawnmower Man. With a similar aesthetic to Second Life, and other early computer generated avatars,  I can see how he compared a few of my uses of generic digital figures in the same way. I’ve attached some photos as well as a short description of the film.

The eccentric Dr. Lawrence Angelo (Pierce Brosnan) puts mentally disabled landscaper Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey) on a regimen of experimental pills and computer-simulated training sequences in hopes of augmenting the man’s intelligence. In time Jobe becomes noticeably brighter and also begins to fare much better with the opposite sex. But, as he develops psychic powers, he realizes that those around him have taken advantage of his simplicity his whole life, and he plots a bloody revenge…..

I’ll be watching this film very soon.

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Whilst discussing my idea of making paintings unreadable without an audience, we ended up talking about Valentina Tanni whom released a fox into a gallery, she then created a piece using the gallery’s CCTV footage of the fox.

 

Obviously this wasn’t completely on topic, though seeing examples of artists playfully mocking the gallery as a space is always intriguing.

http://www.valentinatanni.com/fox-museum/

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Overall the tutorial was very constructive. He introduced me to influences I’d wouldn’t otherwise know, and made me feel very positive about my research. Some points to go forward were for me to try to focus less on perfectly executed ideas, and to experiment more with the mixture of digital and physical processes. He also believed that my concepts surrounding the more linear work had a lot to it, and a lot more to discover with it.

21012015 Tutorial II

 We spoke about my experimentation. Having looked into a variety of mixed media, my intention is to find a balance. Physically I’ve been drawing a lot, painting is something I continue to do, however so far in my research work, I haven’t really found its place. I’ve only been interested to use paint figuratively, as it allows me to be more durable with the final image. Recently my work has been focused on visualising device signals. The progression of this, is to look into how these patterns can be augmented with reality or created in virtual environments. (Mixed Signals I + II, Somewhere Beyond the.com, 01022015 and 03022015). All of this work has hoped to create an abstract impression of everyday connections. Recent tests with blender have been positive, the impact of creating light and shade brings a more realistic impression to these signals. This will help when including architecture and urban infrastructure to the images. I will continue to work with blender, and potentially UE4.

The main point I took from the tutorial was the importance of making maquettes. With my mixed media approach, it allows me to create a miniature of my intentions. The second point was to look at stained glass windows. I’ve recently been testing an LED / Ultrasonic circuit with an arduino, with little luck so far. After speaking with Jonathan, though I should really be asking Ed about this, ultrasonic sensors are notoriously difficult, and it would be better to look into leap motion or an Xbox kinect. The action I’m trying to perform is for LEDs, placed behind a frosted glass panel illuminating gradually as a person approaches. This is to mimic the effect of a head-torch, or lantern, to create a sense of discovery when stumbling across it. In front of the glass will be a laser cut scene, first drawn, and then turned to vector. I’m focused on this idea of the artwork recognising that it has a viewer, and I aim to make small-scale examples of my intentions. Another technological aspect we discussed was the inclusion of projectors. It is not easy to find enough suitable space for a projector to be working through the back of the canvas, as i’d hoped, (though i will continue to experiment with this). Jonathan mentioned short throw projectors, pico projectors, or using one with a 45degree mirror and adjusting the keystoning. These are all possibilities I hope to explore. We talked about the difference between LED and LCD projectors, LEDs have a greater depth of focus, and therefore will remain in focus when placed on a curve. This could be useful when looking at more sculptural experiments.

Other than this, we looked at the work of Daniel Rozen, and compared the similarities between exploring technology through simple materiality, as well as the audience participation involved in his work. Daniel Rozen ‘Wooden Mirror’ 1999:

Another important point for me was to focus on organising and updating my blog. At the beginning of the course, I felt the blog an intrusive force on my practice, and although i realise I must to learn to deal with it, recent weeks have proved particularly unsuccessful. I really do need to organise its functionality, i.e categories, tags, a menu… There is a lot to be done!

Tutorial 1, 10102014

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My first tutorial we discussed my aims, objectives and general themes of my project. Although there are many creases still to iron out, my project will revolve around the themes of identity, media creation/consumption, and virtual space.

We discussed potential techniques. One of which I certainly intend to carry out. I’m looking to create multi-media cityscapes, and therefore am interested in including elements of light and maybe even sound. For the lighting, we talked about the possibility of setting a variety of different coloured LEDs in molten wax casts. Given that glass’s melting temperature is much higher than wax, hopefully the heat will have no effect on the lights….. Though I will have to wait and see. I’m aiming to carry out this test as soon as possible and therefore have a few things to put on the shopping list. Including: An Arduino, LEDs, Wax and an Ice cube tray.

Moving on, we talked about the hilarity of media consumption, specifically within the news. How can, what should be the most delicate information, be broadcast as entertainment across the world. I am no angel with this and certainly have fallen into the trap of watching the news daily, but after a while I can’t help but think that much of it is a gross exploitation of sensitive information. Of course there are fantastic news stories, and necessary information must be broadcast, though it is the manner at which different broadcasters curb these stories to either satisfy their own views, or the views of their audience. And thens there’s the question of ratings…

This can be nicely exemplified by Sky News’s new Conflict tab on their iPad app or the way in which they advertised for Oscar Pistorius’s Sentencing. There’s no doubt that many people across the world have found Oscar’s case both abhorrent and, for the fact that it was broadcast, incredibly captivating, but his sentencing is not Christopher Nolan’s most recent release, and in fact stars no actors, but still they insist on editing their advert as if they’re selling tickets at the cinema. The moody strings and dramatic cuts to slow motion shots of Oscar as he listens to his fate resembles the sort of editing technique that would be used in almost every Oscar nominated trailer.

We discussed my interest in embedding BBC news live into a painting of a family in their living room. It aims to highlight the growing issue of daily news consumption and it’s effects on it’s audience. In this piece, I aim to mirror project the live images onto a canvas. In the gallery, I’m focused on it’s first impressions, whether the audience take it for what they came to see, art, or whether they begin to use it as another information point. Including live data and media into artworks is something I will look into doing. Another idea is to include the live tide times, weather reports into work, however I’m keeping these on the back burner, as I’m not quite sure how i’d approach it yet.

All in all, the tutorial went well. We talked about a range of topics that loosely bared some importance to my project proposal, as well as some techniques in executing them.

A great day!