Tagged: Installation

Gateway Build 2706 – 010716

I realised early last week that a wall was going to be necessary for the door. It was something I considered, but I didn’t think I’d be able to do it. With some sound advice from Ed, Jonathan and Jack I built a fake wall to give the doorway a little more belief, as well as more functionality. The lighting and circuitry can now be hidden behind the walls. Originally, I hoped to make it completely self-contained. This gives Ed and I more room to work with.

Ed began to install the circuit. After some time we managed to get the sensor working in the top of the door as hoped.

I’m entering the final finishes of the piece. I need to put everything together including the scrim and the print. Due to some issues with the scrim this week, I’ve re-thought how to display the work. Instead of attaching the scrim straight to the frame, I’m building a stretcher. The scrim will be stretched over the frame, and the adhesive vinyl print will be fixed to the pack of the scrim. This will allow the lights to give the desired effect through the scrim.

I’ve attached some images below:

 

Emission – Reactive Installation – TRIBE15

Over the summer I purchased a Leap Motion. Within days I was excited about its possibilities and began to play around with it in Processing. The concept for this installation was simple. The Leap Motion as a piece of consumer technology essentially gives the user the ability to interact with the computer in thin air, a sort of realistic attempt at George Lucas’s ‘The Force’… but instead only replacing the use of your mouse. Its a powerful, and very exciting bit of kit. I realised quickly that it would give me the opportunity to create an effect I’d hoped of for a while… for the viewer to customise the artwork to their preference (within set parameters obviously…. so not quite the ultimate customisation i dream of.. but a step in the right direction )…

The simple concept is that those using social media emit identities and have the ability to customise it.

First Attempt, as it appeared on the laptop screen:

In the Gallery:

Kimchi and Chips (Elliot Woods and Mimi Son) “483 Lines”

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483 Lines is the latest installation by Seoul based studio Kimchi and Chips (Elliot Woods and Mimi Son) and is comprised of 483 nylon threads with projections calibrated in 3D to the 16m threads using Rulr, an open source node-based toolkit developed by the studio.

From World War II up until the recent end of analogue broadcasts, decades of living imagery had been constructed using the NTSC standard. This standard represents a moving image frame as 483 lines of modulated light stacked from the top to the bottom of a television screen, within each line there is an analogue continuum, like the groove on a record player. From Nam Jun Paik to the moon landings, pictures were being represented, archived and seen within this format, until the line made way for the pixel and the digital video revolution.

The artwork 483 lines magnifies this analogue video picture until it is 16 meters wide, and then folds this image several times so that it fits vertically into the gallery space, therein adding oscillations of depth into the image which can be activated by ‘tuning’ the projected video to match these waves.

The strictly arranged lines can be illusionary, creating a confusing architecture of horizons, whilst the video played through it displays a parallel past, present and future.

The installation is comprised of laser cut alignment sheets at each end with 2kg of tension on each string (1tonne total). The team used a pulley and a 2kg weight to tension each. Once the team finalised the 3d arrangement, they do a 3d calibration of the projectors to those strings and a 3D edge blend. Rulr allow users to create patches of nodes to calibrate cameras, projectors, tracking systems and other devices. 483 Lines was designed so that the projector would have to be in specific exact positions and angles. Unfortunately this was proving to be impossible so instead by aligning projected pixels to strings, Elliot and Mimi can figure out 4 degrees of freedom. The final 2 degrees are solved by measuring where along the string the projected pixel is landing.

Rulr was made using C++, on top of openFrameworks and runs as a standalone app in in Windows and OSX. It is currently in pre-release state aimed for release later this year. If you are interested in beta testing the software, try catching one of their workshops – next one is up in Amsterdam, part of Coded Matters series ran by FIBER.

written by Filip Visnjic, Creative Applications

LED / Arduino / Projection Tests 01032015 – 08032015

Arduino / LEDs Test: 

1. LED A to B when sensor is activated.

2. LEDs brighten as distance sensor is activated.

3. Reflective Background, LED shines through Prototype cutout.

Projection Test: 

4. Blocking projection light and successful back projection.